Northern Lights Village Levi, Lapland

Updated: Sep 3

The Northern Lights are one of the most spectacular natural phenomena. They are also known as aurora borealis and occur when electrically charged particles from the sun collide with particles in our atmosphere. The energy released by this collision produces an array of colors that we can see when it is dark outside.

The Northern Lights are one of the most spectacular natural phenomena. They are also known as aurora borealis and occur when electrically charged particles from the sun collide with particles in our atmosphere. The energy released by this collision produces an array of colors that we can see when it is dark outside.Northern Lights village Levi.
Northern Lights village Levi, Lapland

The northern lights season in Lapland lasts for several months, but there are some things to know before visiting Lapland during this period to see the northern lights. So here are 6 interesting facts about the northern lights in the village of Levi (Lapland) and beyond:

  1. Northern Lights or Aurora Borealis

  2. Aurora Season in Lapland | Northern Lights season

  3. How can you hunt for Aurora in Lapland?

  4. The best way to photograph the northern lights

  5. There are plenty of ways to see the Northern Lights, but staying at a lightproof village might be the best way

  6. Where else can the northern lights be seen except for Lapland.


1. Northern Lights or Aurora Borealis


Aurora Borealis, also known as the Northern Lights, is a natural phenomenon that occurs in the night sky above the polar regions. The lights are created when solar winds collide with Earth's magnetic field and causes the gases in our atmosphere to glow.


The Northern Lights can be seen from many places around the world but it is most common to see them at higher latitudes during autumn and winter. When you visit Levi village (Finland), you are in an ideal location for viewing these magnificent lights!



2. Aurora Season in Lapland | Northern Lights season


When can you see the northern lights? You'll have to wait until September or October to see the Northern Lights, but it's worth it. The best time of year is from September to March.


Winter is a popular time of year for people who want to experience this phenomenon, as temperatures are colder and there's less light pollution. The Northern Lights are at their most vivid during the months of December to February, when the sun barely sets. You can see them on any night of year, though their visibility is best between these months.


To get a good view of them, you should head up north and take in one of the many tours that provide blankets and hot drinks – or even a glass of champagne – while you wait for them to appear. Aurora Borealis are most visible when there's no light pollution from nearby cities or towns. They are often seen as greenish streaks across the night sky.



3. How can you hunt for Aurora in Lapland?


The Northern Lights are one of the most spectacular phenomena in nature, and can be seen from time to time in Lapland. For those who do not have much experience or knowledge about the Aurora Borealis, it may seem impossible to find them yourself. However, finding your own northern lights is not nearly as difficult as you may think!


To start out with, you need to know when and where these northern lights appear most frequently. There are several factors that influence how often they appear:

  • Time of year: In general, they can be seen between September and March (although this varies depending on where you live). The best months are generally November through February; however, there are exceptions! Keep in mind that weather conditions also play an important role here: so keep reading if that's something important for your trip planning purposes too...

  • Time of day: If we're talking about daytime sightings only, then this simply comes down again mostly just because during these hours there will usually be less light pollution around due to fewer people being awake yet — meaning less interference from artificial sources such as street lamps etcetera).


One of the most exclusive locations is near the resort of Levi, away from the hustle and bustle of tourism, where you'll have an unobstructed view of the northern horizon and an almost 360° view of the sky.


Fancy a trip to this place?


Then book one of Scandinavian Travel Group's unique tours in advance here to hunt for the northern lights in comfort and enjoy your stay at Levi Resort:

The programs can offer you the following pleasant extras:

  • Warm-up area in the Aurora Dome

  • Outdoor campfire area, grilled marshmallows and sausages

  • Warm drink (non-alcoholic berry juice or our special magic drink) with gingerbread.

  • Visit to Aurora hunters’ Snow Igloo Park

  • Photo and video session

  • Bio-toilet


4. The best way to photograph the northern lights


The best way to photograph the northern lights is with a tripod. Tripods allow you to keep the camera steady and ensure that your shots are in focus. It's also important to use a wide angle lens so you can capture more of the sky and make sure that there is room for movement.


When photographing aurora borealis, it's important to choose a shutter release method that will help reduce blurriness caused by camera shake or subject motion (for example, moving clouds). A cable release should work well for this purpose if you're using an SLR camera—but if not, try setting up your smartphone so it can act as an external shutter button without needing any cables at all!


An aperture setting around f/4 works well for aurora photography because it allows enough light in but blurs out some of those distracting stars around the edges of what we see with our eyes (which makes them seem brighter).


Try setting your ISO low too; this will let us get longer exposures without getting too much noise pollution onto our images when they're displayed later on computer screens or printed out onto paper prints themselves!



5. There are plenty of ways to see the Northern Lights, but staying at a lightproof village might be the best way


To see the Northern Lights, you have to be in the right place at the right time. While you could certainly take a chance on your own and hope for the best, it's much easier to join one of these tours that will guarantee you see the lights.


Stay at a lightproof village like Northern Lights village Levi in Lapland.


These villages are specially designed so that light from street lamps, traffic and other sources of illumination does not enter into them (instead being directed away from them). This means guests can enjoy an authentic Lapland experience without any artificial light pollution!


Stay at a hotel with blackout blinds.


Many hotels in Finland provide complete darkness by closing their blinds during bedtime hours so guests can sleep without disruption from any nearby street-lamps or other forms of artificial illumination.


Stay in a cabin or yurt near Finland's dark national parks.


There are many spots throughout Lapland where no artificial lighting exists, including inside some parks which were created specifically for this purpose! Just make sure to bring warm clothes; these areas tend towards very cold temperatures even during summer months due to high elevation levels above sea level (the average elevation level is around 1000 m).




6. Where else can the northern lights be seen except for Lapland


If you want to see the northern lights, you have to go north. The aurora borealis can be seen in northern parts of Europe, northern parts of the USA and Canada, northern parts of Norway and Iceland, northern parts of Russia. The aurora australis can be seen in southern parts of Australia.


The Northern Lights can be seen from many places around the world but it is most common to see them at higher latitudes during autumn and winter. When you visit Levi, you are in an ideal location for viewing these magnificent lights!


All in all, you're hunt for the Northern Lights in Lapland should be an exciting adventure. The lights are elusive and can be difficult to find, but with some patience, perseverance and luck (and maybe even a few tips from this blog post), you’ll have no problem spotting them!


Find more fun facts about Aurora here.


This article contains photos used with permission from @ScandinavianTravelGroup.